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Avoiding Sports Specialization to Preserve our Young Athletes’ Health

Nicholas, Harbaugh, PTA

Sports Specialization has led to a trend over the past couple of years involving our young athletes: the increase in cases of injuries ranging from simple overuse to breaks and/or sprains. This increase in rate and number of injuries seen in young athletes, according to multiple studies, can be linked to the increase of sport specialization in children.  Sport specialization is defined as “year-round intensive training in a single sport at the exclusion of other sports.”

Sport specialization has been associated with high volume training that can result is psychological and physiological stress in an athlete. This stress has been linked to an increased rate of burnout in athletes, as well as recurring and overuse injuries in multiple studies. Overuse injuries otherwise known as cumulative trauma disorders, are described as tissue damage that is a result from repetitive demand over the course of time. The term refers to a vast array of diagnoses: occupational, recreational, and habitual activities. Along with these studies the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) have released statements on their position against sport specialization to prevent these problems from arising.

sports specialization

Children were not always encouraged to specialize in a sport. A factor that may have contributed to this cultural change may be in part due to the increased pressure that coaches and parents place on their children to perform at a higher level to attain a collegiate scholarship or professional contract. In 1993, Ericsson and colleagues proposed a statement that in order for a musician to achieve mastery/expertise in that area you must practice for 10,000 hours. Parents and coaches have adopted this rule and applied it to sports to justify year-round intensive training. Many have adopted and applied this rule to athletes without realizing this was made primarily for musicians. These are high, sometimes costly, expectations for an athlete who performs repetitive, rigorous, sometimes high velocity movements and techniques year round without adequate rest time.

Some people ask “But doesn’t focusing on a sport make our youth excel at that particular sport?” Studies have shown that is not necessarily the case. Some studies have even shown that most multisport athletes (participating in 2-3 sports) show more promise to excel in a sport than a specialized athlete due to an increased overall athleticism and better gross motor function. Many professional and collegiate athletes were multisport athletes.

Examine the Ohio State varsity recruitment habits of coach Urban Myers as they depict a preference for the

young athlete

There have been statements from multiple coaches, along with Urban Meyer’s graph, pertaining to their preference of multisport athletes for example

multisport athlete.  According to Pete Carroll former USC and current Seattle Seahawks coach: “The first questions I’ll ask kids are; “What other sports does he play? Does he play ball? All of those things are important to me. I hate that kids don’t play 3 sports in high school…. I really don’t favor kids having to specialize in one sport.” Dan Starsia University of Virginia men’s lacrosse coach and Tim Corbin of Vanderbilt Baseball both concur with Carroll.

 

If this is the thought process of elite coaches, why, as parents, is ours so different? If the athletes goal is to play in college or to try and make it to a professional level, they need to have an all-around athleticism as most elite athletes do.

Examples of multisport athletes are:

  • Michael Jordan- Basketball and Baseball
  • Abby Wambach- Soccer and Basketball
  • Terry Bradshaw- Football and Baseball
  • Amy Rodriguez- Soccer, Swim, Softball, and Track
  • Tom Brady- Football and Baseball
  • Lauren Holiday- Soccer, Track, and Basketball
  • Babe Zaharias- Track and Field, Golf, Basketball, Tennis, Swimming and Volleyball
  • Wilt Chamberlain- basketball, volleyball and track

With many elite athletes being multisport, we need to get away from the thought process that sport specialization will make our children elite. In fact, sport specialization may be the reason a child does not get to that elite level. With burnout and overuse, reoccurring, and surgery required injuries, specializing in one specific sport may actually do more harm.

Year round training through a child’s growth spurt period places an increased work load on lengthening muscles and developing joints. During a growth spurt, performing consistent intensive training throughout the year will increase the stress that is placed on muscle attachments and the coinciding joints. This increased work load causes an increased risk of joint and ligamentous damage and injury. The more repetitive the motion…the more risk for overuse injuries.

Common overuse injuries associated with sport specialization are as follows with patellofemoral (knee) pain being the most prominent:

  • Osgood-schlatter disease
  • Sever’s disease
  • Medial epicondyle apophysitis
  • Distal radial physeal stress syndrome
  • Proximal humeral physiolysis
  • Stress fracture (e.g. spondylolysis)

A common overuse injury seen in pitchers, for example, is ulnar collateral ligament damage which can lead to having Tommy John surgery. This is the reason why we have pitch counts to limit the amount of stress placed on the elbow joint and the associated ligaments.

To allow proper rest time for the young athlete in organized sports, the AAP recommends

  • that children play multiple sports (2-3)
  • play no more than 8 months a year
  • play no more hours per week than the child’s age (13 year old =13 hours) with a maximum of 16 hours per week total.

You may ask: “What do I if my child is specializing in a sport or gets injured in that sport?” The first thing to do if a child is injured is to get them examined by an orthopedist or physician. Depending on the findings, the next step would be starting a physical therapy plan to address the injury and to examine the mechanics of the athlete and their sport. The physical therapist will help evaluate each athlete’s situation on an individual basis and help to prevent any further injury or re-injury.

If an athlete does not suffer from an injury requiring immediate attention, it is recommended that he or she see a physical therapist to examine their movement patterns and form as well to prevent an injury from occurring and needing any further treatment. Before an athlete gets to that point though, the change must start at home with parents and coaches encouraging children to participate in multiple sports as well as decreasing the amount of pressure to play. After all, the main purpose of participating in sports is for overall physical activity and health and most importantly, fun, and enjoyment!

Talk to your children about their goals and encourage them to participate in more than one sport. Once you know their goals, you will know what they want to achieve! Encouraging diversity in sports can help to decrease the occurrence of overuse injuries.

Nicholas Harbaugh is a Physical Therapist Assistant at FMH Rehabilitation Aspen Ridge Outpatient Clinic.  Nick is experienced in treating orthopedic and sports-related injuries with  traditional land therapy techniques as well as aquatic therapy.


Exercise During Pregnancy

Amelia Iams, DPT

aquatic exercise during pregnancy

Exercise is important to include in everyone’s daily life, but it becomes even more important when you are pregnant. Pregnancy causes many changes in a woman’s body.  Hormone changes in the body cause softening of the ligaments, joint laxity, and instability in the ankles.  Hormones and anxiety can be the reason for increased mood swings.  Changes in the center of gravity due to a growing belly can cause increased occurrence of back pain.  Increased retention of fluid in the body causes swelling in both the hands and feet and can amplify complaints of constipation.

Exercise during pregnancy provides similar benefits to your body as it does during other times in your life, but it also can prevent and minimize changes in the body and pain or discomfort that occurs when you are pregnant. Some of the proven benefits that exercise during pregnancy includes are:

  • Avoidance of excessive weight gain
  • Maintenance or improvement in endurance, muscle strength, and flexibility
  • Reduction of the likelihood of gestational diabetes
  • Decrease or reduction in symptoms of low back pain or pelvic girdle pain
  • Reduction in occurrence of preeclampsia
  • Decrease in the risk of cesarean delivery
  • Reduction in psychological stress

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) states “for healthy pregnant and postpartum women, the guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (ie, equivalent to brisk walking). This activity should be spread throughout the week and adjusted as medically indicated.”  That is equal to about 30 minutes 5 times a week of moderate exercise.  Research also indicates that including both strengthening and aerobic exercise to your routine is important to help support the changes that occur in your body with pregnancy.

Despite all the benefits to exercising while pregnant, most women do not begin an exercise program and those who were exercising prior to pregnancy actually decrease their activity during pregnancy.   Through several studies and surveys, women have stated various reasons for decreasing their activity during pregnancy.  The two most common reasons are: not enough time and pain with movement associated with the pregnancy.

Choosing an exercise program that is safe, can be maintained during the entire 40 weeks of pregnancy, and can fit into a busy work and family schedule is a difficult task.   It is recommended that pregnant women avoid high contact sports and activities that have an increased risk for falls or impact, such as soccer, basketball, hockey, snow skiing, water skiing, and off road cycling.  Exercises that require jumping and quick changes in directions, such as Zumba, Cross fit, and trail running, are not recommended due to joint instability brought on by hormones.  Also high impact aerobics can be difficult to and uncomfortable to perform later in pregnancy.

An underutilized exercise avenue is aquatic exercise programs. Several research studies have advocated the use of pool exercises for women who are pregnant.  The natural properties of water help alleviate many of the adverse changes associated with pregnancy.  The buoyancy of the water will help to eliminate the stresses on the joints and to support the abdomen.  Women have reported feeling more comfortable moving in the water and able to assume better postures as a result of the additional support.  Hydrostatic pressure is an additional benefit when exercising in the water.  The pressure that the water exerts on the body helps to decrease the swelling in the limbs brought on by pregnancy.

Aquatic exercise is non-weight bearing and low impact, so stress on the joints is minimized. Water provides natural resistance to movement which helps to strengthen muscles and thereby incorporating both strengthening and aerobic exercise into one session.  This can help you meet both suggestions for a healthy body during pregnancy without increasing the time you spend at the gym.  Many women stop exercising as their pregnancy progresses because of decreased balance, increased swelling in their feet, or pain and discomfort in their back.  The water helps to support the body, and it is not likely that you will be injured falling in the water. Several studies have proven that exercising in the water during pregnancy helps to decrease low back pain and reduce time off from work due to pain and discomfort.  There are many benefits to exercising in the pool that cannot be achieved with land based exercise, therefore making it an excellent option for women during pregnancy.

There are many fitness centers as well as physical therapy centers that offer aerobic exercise classes in a pool and individualized pool exercise sessions. Choosing the right one for you should be based on several factors, such as cost, location, available time, and expertise of the instructor.  In some cases aquatic therapy can be covered through your health insurance when provided by a physical therapist.  A physical therapist can help design an exercise program that is individualized to you.  Other options to consider when choosing a pool are temperature of the water, depth of the water, and air temperature of the pool area.  Exercising in the water decreases your ability to sweat but there is increased loss of heat through skin contact with both the water in the pool and the air temperature difference in the pool room.  It is recommended that pools utilized for aerobic exercise for pregnant individuals be at about 80-86 degrees Fahrenheit.  Most pools at a gym are cooler to allow for longer time and more intense exercise while therapeutic pools at rehabilitation clinics will be warmer and offer increased comfort for those suffering from back pain.

Safety and monitoring your exercise regimen in the pool is important. The properties of water will naturally decrease the heart rate by increasing the volume the heart pumps out.  If you use your heart rate to gauge your exercise, it is suggested that you decrease your heart rate guidelines by 15 beats per minute.  When exercising in a pool is better to gauge your exercise intensity by using a scale called Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion.  A physical therapist can provide you with the scale and educate you on how to use it.  Dehydration with exercise can occur in the pool as easily as it can on land.  Having access to water during exercise can be important to avoiding any complications with exercise.

All exercise programs are most effective when you can choose an activity they enjoy and a program that is individualized to your needs and goals. We highly recommend water aerobics or any aquatic exercise for women during pregnancy. Aquatic exercise is an exercise program that women would be able to follow throughout the entire 40 weeks of pregnancy.

 

Amelia Iams, DPT is a Physical Therapist at FMH Rehabilitation Aspen Ridge in the treatment and management of sports related and orthopedic injuries.


Aquatic Therapy Can Help Get You Back to…

There is no worse feeling than the aching pain that won’t go away, prevents you from accomplishing everyday tasks, and keeps you from doing the activities you love. If you have recently been injured or identified with having a debilitating diagnosis, aquatic therapy may be your answer to a pain-free lifestyle and get back to the activities you enjoy.

Diagnoses for Patients who benefit from Aquatic Rehabilitationaquatic therapy

Spinal Issues: Thoracic, Cervical, and Lumbar Spine Issues, Posture Issues, Spine Compression Fractures, Herniated Discs, and Spinal Stenosis

Imagine you are floating vertically in the pool using a floatation device. Since you are not touching the bottom, the water decreases the effect of gravity on the spine and creates traction. This process removes the pain you are feeling so you can now focus on learning the therapist’s exercises and doing them appropriately. Core stabilization will be the focal point of your exercises as it permits increased trunk/back movement with less pain due to the warmth, buoyancy, and pressure of the water.

Lymphedema Issues

If you have lymphedema issues, you may be experiencing swelling in your extremities. When you find yourself in the SwimEx Pool, you will notice a decrease in the swelling due to the hydrostatic pressure, making it easier and less painful to do strength exercises. This decrease in swelling will also make walking much easier.

Foot and Ankle Issues: Achilles Tendon Repairs or Tears and Toe, Foot, or Ankle Fractures

Typically, your doctor will give you weight bearing restrictions and you will most likely need a device to assist you while you walk and/or a boot. However, due to the anti-gravity properties of the water, you would not have to adhere to the restrictions. Other positive effects would be a decrease in swelling and less painful side effects. The pool helps you recover much faster because it allows you to work on balance in the early stages of recovery. Normally, patients have a hard time working on this if they are not in the pool due to the stress and pain of their foot or ankle.

Knee or Hip Replacements: ACL Repairs, Arthroscopic Repairs of Hip/Knee, and Patellar Tendon Repairs

The water provides a good environment to work on range of motion, stretching, and strengthen of these tender areas. An important distinction between aquatic and land therapy is the level of soreness associated with each, with aquatic causing much less soreness. Also, aquatic therapy allows you to perform most exercises sooner than on land with much less pain, getting you back to normal in much less time.

Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain patients

Normally physical therapy is the last straw for this type of diagnosis. However, physical therapy in the pool should be one of the first choices since it will help you build stamina, endurance, and strength and manage your pain.

There are many more diagnoses that can be treated utilizing aquatic therapy. If you are not able to tolerate the pain associated with land therapy, aquatic therapy is an excellent alternative due to the anti-gravity environment. You will feel less pain and pressure in the pool and be able to make progress sooner than typical land therapy.

Get the therapy you need so that you can get back to your day-to-day routine and the actives you love. The goal of any rehabilitation team is to get you back to doing the activities you enjoy. Swinging a tennis racket. Walking through the woods. Peddling a bike around town. Pushing a cart down the grocery aisle. Even folding laundry! No matter the activity, enjoy life!

The ultimate goal of any therapy program is to get you back to _______ .   What is your blank?

Contributors: Morgan Thompson, Amelia Iams, DPT, Cynthia Brendle, PTA

 


Does your Bladder Dictate your Life? Let’s talk.

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. 

~Lynne Schill, Physical Therapist, Guest Author
Lynne Schill is a Women’s Health Physical Therapist at FMH Rehabilitation Women’s Center Crestwood. She has experience in treating women’s health diagnoses and has found this work to be extremely rewarding because of how significantly it can improve quality of life. Her compassionate nature coupled with an incredibly warm bedside manner inspires confidence, determination and empowers the individual to become proactive in their own recovery.

Does your bladder dictate your life? Do you have to plan your day around where the next bathroom is?  restroom signAre you afraid to leave your home for fear of not making it to the next bathroom or leaking? Do you feel something bulging in your vagina or have you been diagnosed with pelvic prolapse? Do you suffer from pelvic pain which affects your lifestyle and intimacy? Do you skip the jumping jacks or walk instead of run during your exercise routine?

May 8th through the 13th is National Women’s Health Week with the goal to empower women to make their health a top priority and to educate women on the steps to take to improve their health.   Women’s issues are important and most women suffer needlessly because they are not aware of the rehabilitation programming designed especially for women.

So, did you answer yes to any of the questions above? If so, you may be a candidate for women’s health physical therapy!  Physical therapy (PT) is a great alternative for women who don’t want to take medication and want to avoid surgery for incontinence, pelvic pain, and pelvic prolapse. Don’t let your bladder dictate your life or continue to suffer from pelvic pain, which can affect your lifestyle and intimacy.

Women often suffer in silence, not mentioning these problems to their healthcare provider and think they just have to “live with it”. However, there is hope—and help available, with physical therapists who have been specially trained to treat these conditions.

According to the National Association for Continence (NAFC), 26% of women between the ages of 18-59 have involuntary leakage, 20% of women over 40 also have overactive bladder, and 66% of women and men ages 30-70 have never discussed their bladder health with a healthcare provider.

It’s time to start the conversation!

My incontinence…

There are three types of incontinence: urge, stress, and mixed (which is combination of the first two).

Urge incontinence is when there are strong urges to urinate even though the bladder may not be full and there is an increased frequency of urination. Physical therapy treatment approaches include filling out a detailed three-day bladder log. Information gathered in this log includes the number of voids per day and night, how much is voided, what the patient was doing at the time, determining if the patient is drinking enough water, and identifying any dietary triggers.  Often, eliminating bladder irritants from the diet including caffeine, alcohol, citrus, carbonated beverages, and artificial sweeteners can help decrease or stop the problem.  Smoking can also be a factor, as can constipation.

Running to the bathroom and frequent emptying ‘just in case’ can actually make the problem worse. Teaching patients urge control techniques including standing or sitting quietly, doing a few quick Kegel contractions, and deep breathing can help decrease the urge. Another mistake women make is restricting their fluid intake.  This can not only lead to dehydration, but it can also cause the urine to be more concentrated, which can be irritating to the bladder lining and lead to further urgency.

Urge incontinence and overactive bladder sufferers can benefit from physical therapy relaxation techniques including deep breathing and nervous system quieting in order to help calm the bladder.

Stress incontinence happens with coughing, sneezing, laughing, exercising, or lifting. The increased pressure in the lower abdominal and pelvic region can cause leakage because of weakened pelvic floor muscles.  Pelvic floor muscles provide support to the pelvis and pelvic organs.  One exercise many women know that can help strengthen the pelvic floor is Kegels. However, it might be surprising to know that more than 50% of women perform Kegels incorrectly! A physical therapist can educate you further on pelvic floor anatomy to help identify which muscles you need to be contracting, how to isolate the contraction in order to do a correct Kegel, and then advise you on a home exercise program.   Strengthening the pelvic floor and lower abdominal muscles is especially important for this type of incontinence.  Also, modifying activities and exercise by avoiding a lot of heavy lifting, jumping and running can decrease symptoms.

My pelvic prolapse diagnosis…

Pelvic Prolapse is when a pelvic organ—such as your bladder, rectum or cervix—drops from its normal position. If you suffer from pelvic prolapse, you may benefit from postural education, strengthening of the pelvic floor muscles, activity modification, and positioning techniques to help reduce prolapse symptoms. Eliminating constipation is also important; a physical therapist can teach strategies to achieve regularity in order to avoid bearing down hard, which can potentially increase prolapse.

My pelvic pain…

Pelvic pain can be another life-changing problem for women—causing problems with simple daily activities and affecting intimacy. Pelvic pain and pelvic discomfort can be associated with menopause, post hysterectomy and other surgeries, trauma/injury, pregnancy/child birth, and pelvic malalignment. A physical therapist performs a thorough assessment and develops a program to meet individual needs.  Treatment may include hands on soft tissue techniques, biofeedback, and/or relaxation techniques.

Biofeedback is a valuable tool that is used to assess the muscle activity of the pelvic floor muscles and helps patients recognize when their pelvic floor is relaxed versus in a contracted state. While being coached by a physical therapist, the patient can become more aware of the pelvic floor muscles and how to use them via visual feedback.

Ask yourself, “Would I like to improve my pelvic health and quality of life without surgery or medication?” It’s time to do something about it and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!

A Physical Therapist trained in treating pelvic floor dysfunction is available for your specific needs and diagnosis. Your bladder doesn’t have to dictate your daily routine; you don’t have to live with pelvic pain in silence. You deserve your life back!

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!

 

 


My First Women’s Health Visit is Today

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. Let’s continue the conversation…

WH waitingWhat would I expect on my first visit?

In the first visit, a lot of history taking is done! The more history on the issues that the patient has, the more information can be gathered to work on the best plan of care.

You will be taken to a private treatment room where all you will receive one on one treatment. An extensive personal medical history will be taken as well as a thorough physical assessment of both external structures and internal structures.  From there, your plan of care will be discussed and patient centered goals will established.

How long would my physical therapy treatment last?

The initial evaluation will be approximately an hour.  Follow up visits will vary depending on your need and pain level.  As the pain begins to subside, frequency of visits will be gradually decreased.

What will happen during therapy?

This depends on the diagnosis. During the first couple of follow up visits, you will receive a lot of patient education surrounding your anatomy so you may visualize and understand what area of the body and which muscles specifically we will be targeting.  Your treatment plan might also consist of biofeedback, manuals therapy, and a home exercise program.

You will always be in a private room due to the sensitivity of the situation. Even if no internal work needs to be done, a private setting will allow you the freedom to discuss everything openly with your therapist.

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!


Empower Yourself…Break the Silence on Women’s Health

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. Let’s continue the conversation…

 

How can Women’s Health therapy help?

This type of therapy is a conservative treatment approach which is an alternative to taking medications or even having surgery. Women’s health therapy can help you decrease pain, urinary or fecal leakage, and strength deficits.  Often being educated about lifestyle changes, addressing musculoskeletal factors, identifying and treating weakness or tightness in the pelvic floor muscles can have a big impact on a patient’s symptoms.

What if I feel embarrassed about my condition and it’s hard to talk about?SLP flyer web

It’s completely normal to feel embarrassed when talking about sensitive issues. Just remember, many women feel the same way.  Your therapist has a lot of experience in treating pelvic floor conditions and she will put you at ease about your evaluation and treatment.  The problem you are having is not uncommon, it’s just that people don’t talk about it.  It’s time to get the conversation started!

We don’t have to discuss everything the first day. If you need time to really get to know your therapist that is fine!  Sometimes, we just start with measurements until you become comfortable with your therapist. Being open and honest with your therapist will better help her to help you achieve your goals.

 

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!


It’s Women’s Health Week! Questions? We Have Answers!

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. 

Pure, Natural, Beauty

Promoting Women’s Health & Wellness across the lifespan.

Women’s issues are important and most women suffer needlessly because they are not aware of the rehabilitation programming designed especially for women. Many patients suffer in silence from disorders caused from pregnancy, disease, musculoskeletal injury and surgery, or an unknown etiology.

Women’s Health physical therapists are trained to evaluate and treat the common conditions as well as more extensive diagnoses. The Tx:Team’s Women’s Health Program works with each patient on an individual basis with the ultimate goal of returning you to your daily routine as quickly as possible.  Physical Therapists work alongside you, the patient, to examine, treat, train, and educate.

Many of the diagnoses that women face are sensitive and can make a woman feel embarrassed. It’s time to get the conversations started! Since a women’s health program may be new to a majority of women, there are typically many questions surrounding how the program might help with your diagnosis or problem.

What does a Women’s Health Physical Therapist do?  

Women’s Health Physical Therapists provide specialized physical therapy services to diagnoses specific to women. These clinicians have received additional training for evaluation and treatment of the pelvic floor including both external and internal assessments.

What conditions does the Women’s Health Program address?

  • Urinary Incontinence
  • Pelvic Pain
    • Clitirodynia
    • Levator Ani Syndrome
    • Prudendal neuralgia
    • Vulvodynia/VVS
    • Dyspareunia
    • Coccygodynia
    • Tension Myalgia
  • Pelvic Organ Prolapse
  • Low/Mid Back Pain
  • SI Joint Dysfunction
  • Pregnancy related pain
  • PreNatal/PostPartum Conditions
  • Painful scars (c-section/episiotomy)
  • Diastasis Recti
  • Back Pain
  • Neck/Shoulder Pain
  • Painful Intercourse
  • Sacrococcygeal Joint Dysfunction
  • Osteoporosis
  • Lymphedema Management
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Gynecological surgery (pre/post op care)
  • Myofascial Pain Syndrome
  • Pain associated with Interstitial Cystitis & Endometriosis

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!