Cabin Fever? Beat the Winter Doldrums

“I’m bored.”  In the middle of winter, this phrase can make any mom or dad break out in a sweat.  And a snowy winter day with children who cannot find anything to do may seem to last centuries.  A long day at home or a lengthy winter vacation is the perfect time for children to participate in fun activities that will build their skills, as well as put a stop to the classic complaints of boredom.  Coming up with creative ideas in a variety of skill areas, along with ideas for adaptations for children with special needs, can be a daunting task for parents as well.  Consider the child’s age and/or developmental level, safety, needs, and preferences to help you select appropriate activities to bust those cries of boredom!

 

Plan Ahead

To avoid being put on the spot in coming up with a fun activity when the famous “I’m bored…” complaint erupts, put together a “boredom box” with ideas from which the children can select.  Assist your child with coming up with his or her own ideas of what to include.  This can be a good strategy to use whenever your child has more ideas of things to do than time.  Include skill building activities that are developmentally appropriate and are “just the right challenge” with a fun twist so that the activity is not viewed as work.  To avoid having to scramble for materials for activities at the last minute, organize an additional “supply box” with basic craft supplies (e.g., construction paper, crayons or markers, cardboard tubes, paper plates and bags, glue, glitter or other decorations).   Consider including small craft sets with instructions, puzzles, and small travel games that are new or seldom-used.  Examine the skill categories below and adapt the following activities to your child’s skill level and safety needs.

 

Make Dressing and Self-Care Fun!

Winter break, snow days, and weekends afford plenty of opportunities for children to master the art of getting dressed, due to the extra time to get ready, and the extra seasonal clothing, such as snowsuits and boots.  If your child needs additional practice mastering fasteners, or resists getting dressed without assistance, incorporate fasteners and dressing into a game.  When multiple children are present, have a suitcase race where children don clothes (over their own clothing) as quickly as they can to win a prize—this can be done as a relay race for more than two children.  Institute a fashion show where the children can practice putting together their own outfits from old clothes (including parents’ clothing), or a doll or stuffed animal fashion show.

 

Visual and Fine Motor Skills

As visual and fine motor skills are an integral part of the school day from an early age, incorporating some of the fun activities below at home will help to boost skills

  • Make some homemade Valentines or birthday cards.
  • Write letters to family or friends on personalized letterhead.
  • Design scrapbook pages from a recent vacation or holiday to incorporate cutting, coloring, and handwriting.
  • Dust off the jigsaw puzzles, legos, lincoln logs, or travel editions of games (these have smaller parts).
  • Encourage building from a model made by a parent or older sibling, or if appropriate, building from instructions on the box. In addition to visual motor skills, word finds or crossword puzzles build vocabulary, and your child can design his or her own puzzle for someone else to solve.
  • For imaginary play, set up a pretend office with supplies such as paper clips, binder clips, old folders, or junk mail to practice manipulating common items. Get messy with squirt bottles (to spray a window or shower), hole punches, or clay tools and presses to strengthen fingers.
  • You can make handwriting fun by designing a secret code to write with fun squiggly pens, bathtub or window markers, or invisible ink markers.
  • Institute a “no-talking, only writing” time to communicate for fifteen minutes or so to encourage writing (this also might help to calm a noisy household).

 

Gross Motor Skills

After spending too much time indoors due to inclement weather, children will need to find a safe way to move around and expend some energy.

  • In a large, open area (basement, family room), provide your children with common household items, such as chairs, plastic juice bottles, a broom handle, hula hoops, or jump rope to design an obstacle course (with adult supervision for safety).
  • Hang up an over-the-door basketball hoop, or design one from a box with the top and bottom cut out to play rag basketball (from knotted up towels or t-shirts), or use a lightweight sponge ball.  Using these homemade toys or games can be more fun than purchased ones, and this will encourage their creative development.
  • If your child enjoys dance or aerobic exercise, consider renting or purchasing an inexpensive exercise or dance video for kids, use a dance pad video game, or have your own dance choreography contest.
  • Consider games from birthday parties or gym class, such as “Twister,” hopscotch (many toy stores offer foam mats), hula hoops, jump rope, “Simon Says,” or “charades” to encourage development of certain movement skills and physical activity.  By playing these games in a fun, friendly atmosphere, rather than being graded in gym class, or being concerned with winning a prize in sports, children who have difficulties with coordination may become more comfortable with motor planning.

 

Cognitive and Social Skills

We all continue to build our cognitive and social skills throughout life, establishing systems to do things and how we appear to other people; therefore, these are very important skills to practice.

  • If your child has difficulties interpreting emotions from facial expressions and body language, try body language charades (what is this person telling you?) or making an emotions collage of people from magazines with a designated facial expression or body language.
  • Practice teamwork by building something together or use an obstacle course as a relay race.
  • Work on sequencing via the oldie but goodie “follow directions game” by having children write down the directions to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, then have someone else make the sandwich following the directions exactly (use your *clean* hands if the directions don’t specify a knife)!

 

Sensory Skills

For children who have difficulties interpreting and processing sensory information, winter may be a difficult time to get used to seasonal changes in sensory input, and less access to outdoors (where many calming strategies might be located).

  • You can put clean snow in a dishpan or large plastic container for some table play inside to adjust to the sensation and temperature of snow prior to immersing the child in snow outside.
  • For a slightly easier to clean up sensory experience, place rice, beans, flax, or popcorn kernels into a bowl/bin/container with some of those summer sand toys!
  • Also, pull out the summer mini child’s pool, and fill with lightweight plastic balls (available at many toy stores) to create your own ball pit.
  • To create an indoor quiet area, your children may enjoy draping old sheets or blankets over two chairs to create a tent or use a large (appliance) box for a calming space with cushions or pillows for resting.
  • Children may enjoy spending a day inside making pretzels, kneading bread dough, rolling out cookie dough, or making “slime” as a tactile sensory experience.
  • Some household heavy work can be calming to children with “cabin fever,” such as pushing or pulling a vacuum, pushing a shopping cart, shoveling snow, pushing a wagon or wheelbarrow—all of these should be of appropriate size/weight (toy or regular), depending on the child’s size/abilities.

 

Seeking Expert Assistance

If your child has significant difficulties with dressing/fasteners, fine motor or handwriting skills, visual motor skills, motor planning, or sensitivity to tactile experiences, he or she may benefit from a physician’s referral for a pediatric therapy evaluation.  A pediatric therapist working in an outpatient center can determine if your child could benefit from skilled services and home exercise programs that build on these skills.

The Weekend Warrior and Olympian Champs All Rely on Physical Therapy

The Winter Olympics are starting! For an Olympic athlete, training is a year-round activity.  But many of us non-Olympians go to the gym, work hard, and participate in recreational activities we love.

Olympians put a lot of stress and strain on their bodies. And so do we as weekend warriors. Odds are when you incur an injury, much like the Olympians, you will start a rehabilitation program.  What are the differences?  Not many!  Your physical therapist is most times using the same treatment strategies that are used on Olympic athletes

Evaluation

Your therapist will evaluate your current status and work with you to develop a treatment plan based on your goals. They will ask you questions about your current lifestyle, routines, and history to customize an individualized plan unique to you.  At each visit, your progress and treatment plan are reviewed and your therapist may ask you additional questions and adjust your goals to help you reach maximum success.

Remember, no matter your level, all athletes set goals.

Treatment Plans

Your physical therapist will take in account your current limitations and devise a plan to slowly and methodically reach your short and long-term goals. They will be careful to push you just enough so that you see progress without overusing those areas that you are seeking treatment.  Just as Olympic trainers push their athletes to reach success.

Participation

When Olympians stop participating in the recovery plans, their chances of success diminish. Your active participation in your rehabilitation recovery is crucial.  Communicating with your Physical Therapist about your daily routine, exercise habits, work schedule, and other obligations can help ensure you accomplish as much as possible during your Physical Therapy session.  And they will always ask you about your Home Exercise Program so be sure you are keeping up with your plan.  Your Physical Therapist expects you to reach self-management – actively maintain the strength, range of motion, and flexibility you have achieved.

Whether you’re a professional athlete, weekend warrior, or recovering from a recent fall, a sprain, or surgery, you can benefit from the same rehab strategies that help Olympians climb on top of that podium and achieve gold!

Welcome to Christina Kuzma

Tx:Team welcomes Christina Kuzma, Manager of Business Development

Christina graduated from Ball State University in 2007 with a Bachelors of Science degree in Fashion Merchandising and a minor in Marketing. She is a three-time Indiana State Champion in the 100-meter dash.  While at Ball State, she was a sprint specialist on the Women’s Track and Field Team and experienced a career-ending injury.  She avoided surgery through an intense physical therapy plan with an excellent therapist.  Her personal journey with physical therapy has been a catalyst for Christina’s passion about her role as Manager of Business Development for Tx:Team.

Since 2008, Christina has held a variety of consulting roles, focused primarily on technology and providing Human Capital Management software to employers. Through her experience working directly with Human Resources and Finance executives, she has become an expert at finding solutions for companies to increase employee engagement and lower operating costs.

Christina is responsible for building relationships and leading business development efforts for Tx:Team’s Employer-Based Clinic solution.

Tx:Team partners with Canvas: our next hire is only a text away

recruiting

Changing the Landscape of Recruiting

Indianapolis, IN: The recruiting process has now been tailored to today’s candidate with the introduction by text.  Tx:Team, has partnered with Canvas, the world’s first text-based interviewing platform,  to be the first rehabilitation company to use this unique texting service in the hiring process.

 

What does the partnership bring to Tx:Team Recruiting?

The Tx:Team recruiting process has always been personal. But now, with the addition of the Canvas platform, candidates will be able to have conversations with Tx:Team recruiters at their convenience. With estimates of 50 million millennials to be hired between now and 2025, the hiring process must evolve to attract this texting generation. Starting the conversation through text not only adds a personal touch for the candidate, but it also allows the recruiter to engage and screen candidates much earlier in the recruitment cycle than ever before.

 

As therapists, our passion, is delivering healthcare, and we provide rewarding, stable careers for skilled therapists. At the very the heart of our success are the committed, caring clinicians changing the lives of patients every day at our Tx:Team clinics. As our name suggests, we build teams that work together to deliver the highest standard of healthcare. The concept of working as a team, and helping and caring for each other, is the essence of Tx:Team.

 

We believe that to create the strongest teams, it’s critical that we attract the right talent and find the perfect place for them to grow their skills. With the partnership of Tx:Team and Canvas, we believe those rehab teams are just a text away.

 

About Tx:Team

Tx:Team is a national physical, occupational, and speech therapy company that partners with healthcare facilities or at an employer’s health clinic, providing a complete, integrated therapy solution. We supply talented clinicians and support staff, and we manage the delivery of their services. We do this efficiently, economically, and effectively. Our model offers exceptional benefits to our clients, our patients, and the dedicated therapists and staff who are at the very heart of Tx:Team.  Follow Tx:Team on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. #txteamrehab

To see all positions available with Tx:Team, visit Careers.

Exercise During Pregnancy

Amelia Iams, DPT

aquatic exercise during pregnancy

Exercise is important to include in everyone’s daily life, but it becomes even more important when you are pregnant. Pregnancy causes many changes in a woman’s body.  Hormone changes in the body cause softening of the ligaments, joint laxity, and instability in the ankles.  Hormones and anxiety can be the reason for increased mood swings.  Changes in the center of gravity due to a growing belly can cause increased occurrence of back pain.  Increased retention of fluid in the body causes swelling in both the hands and feet and can amplify complaints of constipation.

Exercise during pregnancy provides similar benefits to your body as it does during other times in your life, but it also can prevent and minimize changes in the body and pain or discomfort that occurs when you are pregnant. Some of the proven benefits that exercise during pregnancy includes are:

  • Avoidance of excessive weight gain
  • Maintenance or improvement in endurance, muscle strength, and flexibility
  • Reduction of the likelihood of gestational diabetes
  • Decrease or reduction in symptoms of low back pain or pelvic girdle pain
  • Reduction in occurrence of preeclampsia
  • Decrease in the risk of cesarean delivery
  • Reduction in psychological stress

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) states “for healthy pregnant and postpartum women, the guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (ie, equivalent to brisk walking). This activity should be spread throughout the week and adjusted as medically indicated.”  That is equal to about 30 minutes 5 times a week of moderate exercise.  Research also indicates that including both strengthening and aerobic exercise to your routine is important to help support the changes that occur in your body with pregnancy.

Despite all the benefits to exercising while pregnant, most women do not begin an exercise program and those who were exercising prior to pregnancy actually decrease their activity during pregnancy.   Through several studies and surveys, women have stated various reasons for decreasing their activity during pregnancy.  The two most common reasons are: not enough time and pain with movement associated with the pregnancy.

Choosing an exercise program that is safe, can be maintained during the entire 40 weeks of pregnancy, and can fit into a busy work and family schedule is a difficult task.   It is recommended that pregnant women avoid high contact sports and activities that have an increased risk for falls or impact, such as soccer, basketball, hockey, snow skiing, water skiing, and off road cycling.  Exercises that require jumping and quick changes in directions, such as Zumba, Cross fit, and trail running, are not recommended due to joint instability brought on by hormones.  Also high impact aerobics can be difficult to and uncomfortable to perform later in pregnancy.

An underutilized exercise avenue is aquatic exercise programs. Several research studies have advocated the use of pool exercises for women who are pregnant.  The natural properties of water help alleviate many of the adverse changes associated with pregnancy.  The buoyancy of the water will help to eliminate the stresses on the joints and to support the abdomen.  Women have reported feeling more comfortable moving in the water and able to assume better postures as a result of the additional support.  Hydrostatic pressure is an additional benefit when exercising in the water.  The pressure that the water exerts on the body helps to decrease the swelling in the limbs brought on by pregnancy.

Aquatic exercise is non-weight bearing and low impact, so stress on the joints is minimized. Water provides natural resistance to movement which helps to strengthen muscles and thereby incorporating both strengthening and aerobic exercise into one session.  This can help you meet both suggestions for a healthy body during pregnancy without increasing the time you spend at the gym.  Many women stop exercising as their pregnancy progresses because of decreased balance, increased swelling in their feet, or pain and discomfort in their back.  The water helps to support the body, and it is not likely that you will be injured falling in the water. Several studies have proven that exercising in the water during pregnancy helps to decrease low back pain and reduce time off from work due to pain and discomfort.  There are many benefits to exercising in the pool that cannot be achieved with land based exercise, therefore making it an excellent option for women during pregnancy.

There are many fitness centers as well as physical therapy centers that offer aerobic exercise classes in a pool and individualized pool exercise sessions. Choosing the right one for you should be based on several factors, such as cost, location, available time, and expertise of the instructor.  In some cases aquatic therapy can be covered through your health insurance when provided by a physical therapist.  A physical therapist can help design an exercise program that is individualized to you.  Other options to consider when choosing a pool are temperature of the water, depth of the water, and air temperature of the pool area.  Exercising in the water decreases your ability to sweat but there is increased loss of heat through skin contact with both the water in the pool and the air temperature difference in the pool room.  It is recommended that pools utilized for aerobic exercise for pregnant individuals be at about 80-86 degrees Fahrenheit.  Most pools at a gym are cooler to allow for longer time and more intense exercise while therapeutic pools at rehabilitation clinics will be warmer and offer increased comfort for those suffering from back pain.

Safety and monitoring your exercise regimen in the pool is important. The properties of water will naturally decrease the heart rate by increasing the volume the heart pumps out.  If you use your heart rate to gauge your exercise, it is suggested that you decrease your heart rate guidelines by 15 beats per minute.  When exercising in a pool is better to gauge your exercise intensity by using a scale called Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion.  A physical therapist can provide you with the scale and educate you on how to use it.  Dehydration with exercise can occur in the pool as easily as it can on land.  Having access to water during exercise can be important to avoiding any complications with exercise.

All exercise programs are most effective when you can choose an activity they enjoy and a program that is individualized to your needs and goals. We highly recommend water aerobics or any aquatic exercise for women during pregnancy. Aquatic exercise is an exercise program that women would be able to follow throughout the entire 40 weeks of pregnancy.

 

Amelia Iams, DPT is a Physical Therapist at FMH Rehabilitation Aspen Ridge in the treatment and management of sports related and orthopedic injuries.

Join us for the Tx:Team Virtual Meet & Greet Mobile, AL

Are you a Physical Therapist in Alabama?

Join Tx:Team on Monday, February 27th from 12-1pm CST (1-2pm EST) physical therapistto “virtually” meet us!  Find out who we are and the opportunities we have available for Physical Therapists in Alabama!

For more information and to register for the event,             email [email protected]

Find out why “working with us is good therapy“!

 

Aquatic Therapy Can Help Get You Back to…

There is no worse feeling than the aching pain that won’t go away, prevents you from accomplishing everyday tasks, and keeps you from doing the activities you love. If you have recently been injured or identified with having a debilitating diagnosis, aquatic therapy may be your answer to a pain-free lifestyle and get back to the activities you enjoy.

Diagnoses for Patients who benefit from Aquatic Rehabilitationaquatic therapy

Spinal Issues: Thoracic, Cervical, and Lumbar Spine Issues, Posture Issues, Spine Compression Fractures, Herniated Discs, and Spinal Stenosis

Imagine you are floating vertically in the pool using a floatation device. Since you are not touching the bottom, the water decreases the effect of gravity on the spine and creates traction. This process removes the pain you are feeling so you can now focus on learning the therapist’s exercises and doing them appropriately. Core stabilization will be the focal point of your exercises as it permits increased trunk/back movement with less pain due to the warmth, buoyancy, and pressure of the water.

Lymphedema Issues

If you have lymphedema issues, you may be experiencing swelling in your extremities. When you find yourself in the SwimEx Pool, you will notice a decrease in the swelling due to the hydrostatic pressure, making it easier and less painful to do strength exercises. This decrease in swelling will also make walking much easier.

Foot and Ankle Issues: Achilles Tendon Repairs or Tears and Toe, Foot, or Ankle Fractures

Typically, your doctor will give you weight bearing restrictions and you will most likely need a device to assist you while you walk and/or a boot. However, due to the anti-gravity properties of the water, you would not have to adhere to the restrictions. Other positive effects would be a decrease in swelling and less painful side effects. The pool helps you recover much faster because it allows you to work on balance in the early stages of recovery. Normally, patients have a hard time working on this if they are not in the pool due to the stress and pain of their foot or ankle.

Knee or Hip Replacements: ACL Repairs, Arthroscopic Repairs of Hip/Knee, and Patellar Tendon Repairs

The water provides a good environment to work on range of motion, stretching, and strengthen of these tender areas. An important distinction between aquatic and land therapy is the level of soreness associated with each, with aquatic causing much less soreness. Also, aquatic therapy allows you to perform most exercises sooner than on land with much less pain, getting you back to normal in much less time.

Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain patients

Normally physical therapy is the last straw for this type of diagnosis. However, physical therapy in the pool should be one of the first choices since it will help you build stamina, endurance, and strength and manage your pain.

There are many more diagnoses that can be treated utilizing aquatic therapy. If you are not able to tolerate the pain associated with land therapy, aquatic therapy is an excellent alternative due to the anti-gravity environment. You will feel less pain and pressure in the pool and be able to make progress sooner than typical land therapy.

Get the therapy you need so that you can get back to your day-to-day routine and the actives you love. The goal of any rehabilitation team is to get you back to doing the activities you enjoy. Swinging a tennis racket. Walking through the woods. Peddling a bike around town. Pushing a cart down the grocery aisle. Even folding laundry! No matter the activity, enjoy life!

The ultimate goal of any therapy program is to get you back to _______ .   What is your blank?

Contributors: Morgan Thompson, Amelia Iams, DPT, Cynthia Brendle, PTA

 

My First Women’s Health Visit is Today

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. Let’s continue the conversation…

WH waitingWhat would I expect on my first visit?

In the first visit, a lot of history taking is done! The more history on the issues that the patient has, the more information can be gathered to work on the best plan of care.

You will be taken to a private treatment room where all you will receive one on one treatment. An extensive personal medical history will be taken as well as a thorough physical assessment of both external structures and internal structures.  From there, your plan of care will be discussed and patient centered goals will established.

How long would my physical therapy treatment last?

The initial evaluation will be approximately an hour.  Follow up visits will vary depending on your need and pain level.  As the pain begins to subside, frequency of visits will be gradually decreased.

What will happen during therapy?

This depends on the diagnosis. During the first couple of follow up visits, you will receive a lot of patient education surrounding your anatomy so you may visualize and understand what area of the body and which muscles specifically we will be targeting.  Your treatment plan might also consist of biofeedback, manuals therapy, and a home exercise program.

You will always be in a private room due to the sensitivity of the situation. Even if no internal work needs to be done, a private setting will allow you the freedom to discuss everything openly with your therapist.

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!

Empower Yourself…Break the Silence on Women’s Health

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. Let’s continue the conversation…

 

How can Women’s Health therapy help?

This type of therapy is a conservative treatment approach which is an alternative to taking medications or even having surgery. Women’s health therapy can help you decrease pain, urinary or fecal leakage, and strength deficits.  Often being educated about lifestyle changes, addressing musculoskeletal factors, identifying and treating weakness or tightness in the pelvic floor muscles can have a big impact on a patient’s symptoms.

What if I feel embarrassed about my condition and it’s hard to talk about?SLP flyer web

It’s completely normal to feel embarrassed when talking about sensitive issues. Just remember, many women feel the same way.  Your therapist has a lot of experience in treating pelvic floor conditions and she will put you at ease about your evaluation and treatment.  The problem you are having is not uncommon, it’s just that people don’t talk about it.  It’s time to get the conversation started!

We don’t have to discuss everything the first day. If you need time to really get to know your therapist that is fine!  Sometimes, we just start with measurements until you become comfortable with your therapist. Being open and honest with your therapist will better help her to help you achieve your goals.

 

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!

It’s Women’s Health Week! Questions? We Have Answers!

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. 

Pure, Natural, Beauty

Promoting Women’s Health & Wellness across the lifespan.

Women’s issues are important and most women suffer needlessly because they are not aware of the rehabilitation programming designed especially for women. Many patients suffer in silence from disorders caused from pregnancy, disease, musculoskeletal injury and surgery, or an unknown etiology.

Women’s Health physical therapists are trained to evaluate and treat the common conditions as well as more extensive diagnoses. The Tx:Team’s Women’s Health Program works with each patient on an individual basis with the ultimate goal of returning you to your daily routine as quickly as possible.  Physical Therapists work alongside you, the patient, to examine, treat, train, and educate.

Many of the diagnoses that women face are sensitive and can make a woman feel embarrassed. It’s time to get the conversations started! Since a women’s health program may be new to a majority of women, there are typically many questions surrounding how the program might help with your diagnosis or problem.

What does a Women’s Health Physical Therapist do?  

Women’s Health Physical Therapists provide specialized physical therapy services to diagnoses specific to women. These clinicians have received additional training for evaluation and treatment of the pelvic floor including both external and internal assessments.

What conditions does the Women’s Health Program address?

  • Urinary Incontinence
  • Pelvic Pain
    • Clitirodynia
    • Levator Ani Syndrome
    • Prudendal neuralgia
    • Vulvodynia/VVS
    • Dyspareunia
    • Coccygodynia
    • Tension Myalgia
  • Pelvic Organ Prolapse
  • Low/Mid Back Pain
  • SI Joint Dysfunction
  • Pregnancy related pain
  • PreNatal/PostPartum Conditions
  • Painful scars (c-section/episiotomy)
  • Diastasis Recti
  • Back Pain
  • Neck/Shoulder Pain
  • Painful Intercourse
  • Sacrococcygeal Joint Dysfunction
  • Osteoporosis
  • Lymphedema Management
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Gynecological surgery (pre/post op care)
  • Myofascial Pain Syndrome
  • Pain associated with Interstitial Cystitis & Endometriosis

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!