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Exercise During Pregnancy

Amelia Iams, DPT

aquatic exercise during pregnancy

Exercise is important to include in everyone’s daily life, but it becomes even more important when you are pregnant. Pregnancy causes many changes in a woman’s body.  Hormone changes in the body cause softening of the ligaments, joint laxity, and instability in the ankles.  Hormones and anxiety can be the reason for increased mood swings.  Changes in the center of gravity due to a growing belly can cause increased occurrence of back pain.  Increased retention of fluid in the body causes swelling in both the hands and feet and can amplify complaints of constipation.

Exercise during pregnancy provides similar benefits to your body as it does during other times in your life, but it also can prevent and minimize changes in the body and pain or discomfort that occurs when you are pregnant. Some of the proven benefits that exercise during pregnancy includes are:

  • Avoidance of excessive weight gain
  • Maintenance or improvement in endurance, muscle strength, and flexibility
  • Reduction of the likelihood of gestational diabetes
  • Decrease or reduction in symptoms of low back pain or pelvic girdle pain
  • Reduction in occurrence of preeclampsia
  • Decrease in the risk of cesarean delivery
  • Reduction in psychological stress

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) states “for healthy pregnant and postpartum women, the guidelines recommend at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (ie, equivalent to brisk walking). This activity should be spread throughout the week and adjusted as medically indicated.”  That is equal to about 30 minutes 5 times a week of moderate exercise.  Research also indicates that including both strengthening and aerobic exercise to your routine is important to help support the changes that occur in your body with pregnancy.

Despite all the benefits to exercising while pregnant, most women do not begin an exercise program and those who were exercising prior to pregnancy actually decrease their activity during pregnancy.   Through several studies and surveys, women have stated various reasons for decreasing their activity during pregnancy.  The two most common reasons are: not enough time and pain with movement associated with the pregnancy.

Choosing an exercise program that is safe, can be maintained during the entire 40 weeks of pregnancy, and can fit into a busy work and family schedule is a difficult task.   It is recommended that pregnant women avoid high contact sports and activities that have an increased risk for falls or impact, such as soccer, basketball, hockey, snow skiing, water skiing, and off road cycling.  Exercises that require jumping and quick changes in directions, such as Zumba, Cross fit, and trail running, are not recommended due to joint instability brought on by hormones.  Also high impact aerobics can be difficult to and uncomfortable to perform later in pregnancy.

An underutilized exercise avenue is aquatic exercise programs. Several research studies have advocated the use of pool exercises for women who are pregnant.  The natural properties of water help alleviate many of the adverse changes associated with pregnancy.  The buoyancy of the water will help to eliminate the stresses on the joints and to support the abdomen.  Women have reported feeling more comfortable moving in the water and able to assume better postures as a result of the additional support.  Hydrostatic pressure is an additional benefit when exercising in the water.  The pressure that the water exerts on the body helps to decrease the swelling in the limbs brought on by pregnancy.

Aquatic exercise is non-weight bearing and low impact, so stress on the joints is minimized. Water provides natural resistance to movement which helps to strengthen muscles and thereby incorporating both strengthening and aerobic exercise into one session.  This can help you meet both suggestions for a healthy body during pregnancy without increasing the time you spend at the gym.  Many women stop exercising as their pregnancy progresses because of decreased balance, increased swelling in their feet, or pain and discomfort in their back.  The water helps to support the body, and it is not likely that you will be injured falling in the water. Several studies have proven that exercising in the water during pregnancy helps to decrease low back pain and reduce time off from work due to pain and discomfort.  There are many benefits to exercising in the pool that cannot be achieved with land based exercise, therefore making it an excellent option for women during pregnancy.

There are many fitness centers as well as physical therapy centers that offer aerobic exercise classes in a pool and individualized pool exercise sessions. Choosing the right one for you should be based on several factors, such as cost, location, available time, and expertise of the instructor.  In some cases aquatic therapy can be covered through your health insurance when provided by a physical therapist.  A physical therapist can help design an exercise program that is individualized to you.  Other options to consider when choosing a pool are temperature of the water, depth of the water, and air temperature of the pool area.  Exercising in the water decreases your ability to sweat but there is increased loss of heat through skin contact with both the water in the pool and the air temperature difference in the pool room.  It is recommended that pools utilized for aerobic exercise for pregnant individuals be at about 80-86 degrees Fahrenheit.  Most pools at a gym are cooler to allow for longer time and more intense exercise while therapeutic pools at rehabilitation clinics will be warmer and offer increased comfort for those suffering from back pain.

Safety and monitoring your exercise regimen in the pool is important. The properties of water will naturally decrease the heart rate by increasing the volume the heart pumps out.  If you use your heart rate to gauge your exercise, it is suggested that you decrease your heart rate guidelines by 15 beats per minute.  When exercising in a pool is better to gauge your exercise intensity by using a scale called Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion.  A physical therapist can provide you with the scale and educate you on how to use it.  Dehydration with exercise can occur in the pool as easily as it can on land.  Having access to water during exercise can be important to avoiding any complications with exercise.

All exercise programs are most effective when you can choose an activity they enjoy and a program that is individualized to your needs and goals. We highly recommend water aerobics or any aquatic exercise for women during pregnancy. Aquatic exercise is an exercise program that women would be able to follow throughout the entire 40 weeks of pregnancy.

 

Amelia Iams, DPT is a Physical Therapist at FMH Rehabilitation Aspen Ridge in the treatment and management of sports related and orthopedic injuries.


Join us for the Tx:Team Virtual Meet & Greet Mobile, AL

Are you a Physical Therapist in Alabama?

Join Tx:Team on Monday, February 27th from 12-1pm CST (1-2pm EST) physical therapistto “virtually” meet us!  Find out who we are and the opportunities we have available for Physical Therapists in Alabama!

For more information and to register for the event,             email [email protected]

Find out why “working with us is good therapy“!

 


Posted in General

Aquatic Therapy Can Help Get You Back to…

There is no worse feeling than the aching pain that won’t go away, prevents you from accomplishing everyday tasks, and keeps you from doing the activities you love. If you have recently been injured or identified with having a debilitating diagnosis, aquatic therapy may be your answer to a pain-free lifestyle and get back to the activities you enjoy.

Diagnoses for Patients who benefit from Aquatic Rehabilitationaquatic therapy

Spinal Issues: Thoracic, Cervical, and Lumbar Spine Issues, Posture Issues, Spine Compression Fractures, Herniated Discs, and Spinal Stenosis

Imagine you are floating vertically in the pool using a floatation device. Since you are not touching the bottom, the water decreases the effect of gravity on the spine and creates traction. This process removes the pain you are feeling so you can now focus on learning the therapist’s exercises and doing them appropriately. Core stabilization will be the focal point of your exercises as it permits increased trunk/back movement with less pain due to the warmth, buoyancy, and pressure of the water.

Lymphedema Issues

If you have lymphedema issues, you may be experiencing swelling in your extremities. When you find yourself in the SwimEx Pool, you will notice a decrease in the swelling due to the hydrostatic pressure, making it easier and less painful to do strength exercises. This decrease in swelling will also make walking much easier.

Foot and Ankle Issues: Achilles Tendon Repairs or Tears and Toe, Foot, or Ankle Fractures

Typically, your doctor will give you weight bearing restrictions and you will most likely need a device to assist you while you walk and/or a boot. However, due to the anti-gravity properties of the water, you would not have to adhere to the restrictions. Other positive effects would be a decrease in swelling and less painful side effects. The pool helps you recover much faster because it allows you to work on balance in the early stages of recovery. Normally, patients have a hard time working on this if they are not in the pool due to the stress and pain of their foot or ankle.

Knee or Hip Replacements: ACL Repairs, Arthroscopic Repairs of Hip/Knee, and Patellar Tendon Repairs

The water provides a good environment to work on range of motion, stretching, and strengthen of these tender areas. An important distinction between aquatic and land therapy is the level of soreness associated with each, with aquatic causing much less soreness. Also, aquatic therapy allows you to perform most exercises sooner than on land with much less pain, getting you back to normal in much less time.

Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain patients

Normally physical therapy is the last straw for this type of diagnosis. However, physical therapy in the pool should be one of the first choices since it will help you build stamina, endurance, and strength and manage your pain.

There are many more diagnoses that can be treated utilizing aquatic therapy. If you are not able to tolerate the pain associated with land therapy, aquatic therapy is an excellent alternative due to the anti-gravity environment. You will feel less pain and pressure in the pool and be able to make progress sooner than typical land therapy.

Get the therapy you need so that you can get back to your day-to-day routine and the actives you love. The goal of any rehabilitation team is to get you back to doing the activities you enjoy. Swinging a tennis racket. Walking through the woods. Peddling a bike around town. Pushing a cart down the grocery aisle. Even folding laundry! No matter the activity, enjoy life!

The ultimate goal of any therapy program is to get you back to _______ .   What is your blank?

Contributors: Morgan Thompson, Amelia Iams, DPT, Cynthia Brendle, PTA

 


My First Women’s Health Visit is Today

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. Let’s continue the conversation…

WH waitingWhat would I expect on my first visit?

In the first visit, a lot of history taking is done! The more history on the issues that the patient has, the more information can be gathered to work on the best plan of care.

You will be taken to a private treatment room where all you will receive one on one treatment. An extensive personal medical history will be taken as well as a thorough physical assessment of both external structures and internal structures.  From there, your plan of care will be discussed and patient centered goals will established.

How long would my physical therapy treatment last?

The initial evaluation will be approximately an hour.  Follow up visits will vary depending on your need and pain level.  As the pain begins to subside, frequency of visits will be gradually decreased.

What will happen during therapy?

This depends on the diagnosis. During the first couple of follow up visits, you will receive a lot of patient education surrounding your anatomy so you may visualize and understand what area of the body and which muscles specifically we will be targeting.  Your treatment plan might also consist of biofeedback, manuals therapy, and a home exercise program.

You will always be in a private room due to the sensitivity of the situation. Even if no internal work needs to be done, a private setting will allow you the freedom to discuss everything openly with your therapist.

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!


Empower Yourself…Break the Silence on Women’s Health

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. Let’s continue the conversation…

 

How can Women’s Health therapy help?

This type of therapy is a conservative treatment approach which is an alternative to taking medications or even having surgery. Women’s health therapy can help you decrease pain, urinary or fecal leakage, and strength deficits.  Often being educated about lifestyle changes, addressing musculoskeletal factors, identifying and treating weakness or tightness in the pelvic floor muscles can have a big impact on a patient’s symptoms.

What if I feel embarrassed about my condition and it’s hard to talk about?SLP flyer web

It’s completely normal to feel embarrassed when talking about sensitive issues. Just remember, many women feel the same way.  Your therapist has a lot of experience in treating pelvic floor conditions and she will put you at ease about your evaluation and treatment.  The problem you are having is not uncommon, it’s just that people don’t talk about it.  It’s time to get the conversation started!

We don’t have to discuss everything the first day. If you need time to really get to know your therapist that is fine!  Sometimes, we just start with measurements until you become comfortable with your therapist. Being open and honest with your therapist will better help her to help you achieve your goals.

 

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!


It’s Women’s Health Week! Questions? We Have Answers!

May 8th through the 13th is Women’s Health Week and the goal is to empower women to make their health a top priority and educate on the steps women can take to improve their health.  During the week, you can get the answers to top questions that are asked about Women’s Health. 

Pure, Natural, Beauty

Promoting Women’s Health & Wellness across the lifespan.

Women’s issues are important and most women suffer needlessly because they are not aware of the rehabilitation programming designed especially for women. Many patients suffer in silence from disorders caused from pregnancy, disease, musculoskeletal injury and surgery, or an unknown etiology.

Women’s Health physical therapists are trained to evaluate and treat the common conditions as well as more extensive diagnoses. The Tx:Team’s Women’s Health Program works with each patient on an individual basis with the ultimate goal of returning you to your daily routine as quickly as possible.  Physical Therapists work alongside you, the patient, to examine, treat, train, and educate.

Many of the diagnoses that women face are sensitive and can make a woman feel embarrassed. It’s time to get the conversations started! Since a women’s health program may be new to a majority of women, there are typically many questions surrounding how the program might help with your diagnosis or problem.

What does a Women’s Health Physical Therapist do?  

Women’s Health Physical Therapists provide specialized physical therapy services to diagnoses specific to women. These clinicians have received additional training for evaluation and treatment of the pelvic floor including both external and internal assessments.

What conditions does the Women’s Health Program address?

  • Urinary Incontinence
  • Pelvic Pain
    • Clitirodynia
    • Levator Ani Syndrome
    • Prudendal neuralgia
    • Vulvodynia/VVS
    • Dyspareunia
    • Coccygodynia
    • Tension Myalgia
  • Pelvic Organ Prolapse
  • Low/Mid Back Pain
  • SI Joint Dysfunction
  • Pregnancy related pain
  • PreNatal/PostPartum Conditions
  • Painful scars (c-section/episiotomy)
  • Diastasis Recti
  • Back Pain
  • Neck/Shoulder Pain
  • Painful Intercourse
  • Sacrococcygeal Joint Dysfunction
  • Osteoporosis
  • Lymphedema Management
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Gynecological surgery (pre/post op care)
  • Myofascial Pain Syndrome
  • Pain associated with Interstitial Cystitis & Endometriosis

Tx:Team Women’s Health Physical Therapy programs can be found at FMH Rehabilitation in Frederick, MD, St. Vincent Frankfort Hospital in Frankfort, IN, and St. Vincent Jennings Hospital in North Vernon, IN. Ladies, it’s time to take the steps to improve your health and Women’s Health Week is the perfect time to start!


Get Your Family Moving: Rake Leaves!

Family raking leaves

Family raking leaves

Autumn is a beautiful season with the changing of the leaves but it also brings about some hefty yard work in removing them. Raking leaves is actually very hard work and good physical exercise at the same time. Your equipment needs are simple: your body and a rake.  Raking burns about 300 calories an hour while toning your arms and strengthening your back and legs.  Just be sure to stretch first and, to avoid muscle pulls, don’t try to do the whole yard at once.

Regular exercise no matter what type can boost energy, build strength & stamina, improve balance and even help to reduce some signs of aging.

Tips for Safe Raking:

Do a pre-rake warm-up:

It may not seem like a workout, but you can burn nearly 300 calories during an hour of raking!

  • Walk around a bit before you start so your blood gets flowing.
  • Do a couple of stretches to prevent straining the muscles of your shoulders, neck, and back.
  • Side bends and knee-to-chest lifts help open you up and ready you for all of the raking, bending, and lifting you’ll be doing.

Practice proper raking posture:

  • To keep your neck and back happy, stand upright and rake leaves to the side of you, alternating your dominant hand now and then.
  • Bend at the knees – not the waist – when picking up piles of gathered leaves.
  • Keep the rake mostly perpendicular to the ground (i.e. between 65 to 85 degrees.) That will give your body easy leverage on the rake, making it easy to move, and easy on your body.
  • Avoid twisting to toss leaves. Instead, step to the side so your whole body switches position, not just your shoulders and back.
  • Switch sides now and then and take breaks, especially if you haven’t raked since last fall.
  • Take it easy on your back. Move your whole body and not just your spine.

Take rake breaks:

The repetitiveness of raking can become painful after a while.

  • Only rake small sections at a time as this will save energy. Take breaks when you get tired every 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Sip on water to stay hydrated.
  • Stretch to release tension you may have built up.

Using the proper techniques is essential. If part of your body is sore, it is probably telling you that you have overdone it or you are using the wrong technique. Rake so it’s natural and comfortable with the power of your movements coming from your legs.

So, get your family or even some of your friends involved and get your bodies moving! Also, don’t forget to look out for your pets or small children who may jump into your pile of leaves!

 


Posted in General, Wellness

Navigating the Experience Spectrum

fork in the road webIn a world where changing technology and demographics have forced some careers to rapidly evolve or even go extinct, the therapist’s job description has largely gone unchanged.  So many of our Tx:Team clinicians, whether 30 days out of school or 30 years on the job, find that their passion for treating patients is very similar to someone who’s been treating for far longer or far less than they have.  Often times, academic backgrounds are identical, but clinicians are treating on polar opposite ends of the spectrum when it comes to clinical experience.

With all attention focused on the patient, it’s always very exciting for a therapy company to find instances where clinicians, either experienced or inexperienced, are relying on their counterparts for advice and opportunities to collaborate on patient care.  The clinical experience component that is so vital to any clinician’s career is helped by the teamwork and collaboration that seems to come naturally to the associates in our facilities.

We’ve paired two clinicians from the same discipline but with different experience levels to get a sense of their team interactions.

We’re appreciative of their input and really proud of their interactions and contributions to their respective teams.

Kelly, OTR, treats in the Assisted Living setting in Charleston, SC.  Kelly is a 1992 graduate of Towson State University.  She specializes in dementia, low vision, neuromuscular, orthopedics, and urinary incontinence.

Q: As an experienced clinician, what do you feel is one thing that you bring to your team?

The knowledge of my past trial and error situations which have worked for some and not for others.  Even with experience, you will run into challenges and need to realize that it’s ok and necessary to try another approach or technique to get the optimal outcome.

Q: What’s one thing you feel you gain from the younger clinicians on your team?

The excitement and energy of being a new therapist.

Q: What advice would you or do you give to new members of your team?

Sometimes there will be some really stressful days, but just take a deep breath and take one patient at a time.  Positive energy in a clinic goes a long way.  Also, it’s ok to not know something.  That’s what other team members, resources, etc. are there for.

Q: Has the role of an OT evolved at all in the time you’ve been treating?

I don’t know how much the role of OT has evolved versus me evolving as an OT. When I started, the focus was self-care and craft based activities. Now, I feel like OT’s have the opportunity to take on more specialized areas at a more technical and educational level such as low vision, urinary incontinence, and power mobility devices.  I know in the past, my co-workers (especially PT’s) would joke around about doing needle-work and wood working projects. I haven’t heard that for a long time.  Maybe we have earned a little more respect from even within the interdisciplinary team.

Q: What’s one thing you know now that you wish you would have when you started treating?

The education and value of using modalities. My college only offered 1 day for modality education for estim, u/s, and paraffin.  I sort of shied away from it for the first several years as an OT.  There are certain areas of OT which modalities can make a world of difference.  I would have started off much earlier taking courses and getting hands on experience.

Q: Have you found the change to the EMR system difficult?  In what ways did you rely on your team in making the transition?

First of all, I had to look up what EMR stands for…guess a new grad would know that.  Electronic Medical Records (EMR) was fairly easy for me.  I actually learned the most by helping others with their questions and we often figured things out together before asking for help.

Q: The nature of the documentation you’re required to do today, in what ways is it better and worse than when you started treating?

With EMR, I have used a lot more objective functional and pain/disability assessments than I used in the past.  It actually helps validate the necessity and makes goal writing more objective like it is supposed to be.  With the forms being right on the computer, there is no need to carry around or anticipate the appropriate forms. It also cues you in areas that you may have forgotten to address.  The only negative to EMR is when computer systems are down or unavailable for use when you need it.  That’s when you wish you could just grab an eval form and a pen.

Q: Could you give an example of a technique that you learned on-the-job and not as a part of your formal clinical education?

In 1997, I worked in a facility where I was assigned to only wheelchair seating and positioning.  I knew almost nothing in this area and was so nervous.  An experienced OT taught me an unbelievable amount over that year and, without that on-the-job training, I don’t know if I would have ever known what I do now.

Q: What was some of the advice or things you learned from the experienced clinicians back when you started treating?

I was always told to constantly look at the whole person.  Whether you are working with UI, low vision, pain, ADL’s, weakness, whatever it is, always step back and look at who that person is, what is important to them and what they want to gain from you. 

Q: Why do you think certain techniques of occupational therapy have gone unchanged despite changes in types of medication and imaging that may have taken place in other areas of healthcare?

We work with people.  People still have the same bones and muscles, the same brain, and overall, the same physical, cognitive and psychological needs to live, work and play.

 

Leslie, OTR has been treating at Frederick Memorial Hospital and the outpatient FMH Rose Hill clinic, both in Frederick, MD.  Leslie came to Tx:Team following her recent graduation from Bridgewater College and Shenandoah University where she completed her clinical education in two and a half years.  Leslie treats both geriatric and pediatric populations, and is a gifted writer, having written a blog on pediatric patients with autism for the company website.

Q: As a younger clinician, what do you feel is one thing that you bring to your team?

I think being a new clinician right out of school, I have a lot of knowledge in regards to current evidence-based practice and new interventions to use with different diagnoses.  So, where as an older clinician may have a lot of experience, I’m bringing forward that new research and new evidence-based information to the clinic.

Q: What’s one thing you feel you gain from the experienced clinicians on your team?

It’s really cool that this job has the opportunity for me to work both in the outpatient setting and in the acute setting.  I don’t have as much experience in the acute setting, but the OTs there have really taken me under their wing.  One of the big things that I picked up over there was the verbiage they would use to educate patients.  It was very concise and to the point and it really got the message across in that setting, especially in regards to orthopedics and precautions as far as final preparations to really educate their patients and keep them safe before going home.

Q: What advice would you or do you give to new members of your team in terms of relying on more experienced clinicians?

I know a lot of therapists, myself included, who want to get everything done and learn everything in the first day, but it really is a learning experience.  It is a process where you’re going to make a few mistakes along the way, but it’s okay.  It’s been instilled in me that I’m still new, and I’m still learning, and they can fix documentation mistakes.  Learning a new EMR system is hard for anyone, and so when you’re starting out of school and you’re a new clinician, you’re not only learning to be a new therapist and learning a new job, you’re learning all the procedures along with it, so just be patient and know that it will become routine and everything will fall into place.

Q: How valuable have you found clinical experience to be in your career thus far?

Experience is very important and, even in the evaluation itself, you pick up verbiage when you’re around certain clinicians it’s really helpful and it kind of becomes a script for you to use as you’re going through your evaluation.  When you’re used to the same verbiage and repeating yourself with every new evaluation that you do, asking the same questions, it becomes habit and routine.  You make sure you’re covering all your bases thoroughly, evaluating all different areas of need for the patient.

Q: Do you feel like using an EMR system is easier for you as a newer clinician?

Our EMR system is pretty unique, and I feel I’m getting a lot of support from the older clinicians as far as navigating through the EMR system just because it has many layers.  However, in terms of technology, I do feel that I am able to help other clinicians find those evidence-based research articles by going through a lot of the university databases.  I think in that aspect, I’m helpful.

Q: What’s one thing you know now that you wish you would have when you started treating?

I think for any career you’re still learning each day and, when I’m treating a patient, it sparks my interest to research further.  I know as I continue to grow and gain more years of experience, I’m going to continue to have to go back to my research and my textbooks to find some of the answers to the questions that my patients spark in me or other questions that I may find interesting as far as diagnoses go and interventions.

Q: Did you have a certain fear coming out of therapy school?

There was some apprehension in that working with the geriatric population, there’s that age difference and although I am young, I appear a lot younger to some of my patients that I’m working with and it’s really important to establish that rapport with your patients, and fill that gap or that bridge between the two of you.  And I think through my first few days of working, I really felt comfortable building that rapport with my patients and treating them individually and making sure my therapy is very client-centered.

Q: Could you give an example of a technique that you learned on-the-job and not as a part of your formal clinical education?

I think some of the educational components I’ve learned in working with the orthopedic patients at the hospital and in the acute care setting, and also along the lines of orthopedics, at FMH Rose Hill, we have a certified hand therapist, so I’ve been doing my best to pick up tidbits from him as far as splinting, to strengthen knowledge in my area of practice.

Q: What do you think you may be learning ten years from now from an incoming therapist?

Manual Therapy techniques change often, so I can imagine looking to them for the most current Manual Therapy techniques and, again, the evidence-based research because it’s so important to our field.

Q: Why do you think certain techniques of occupational therapy have gone unchanged in comparison to some of the career types that have evolved over time within and outside of healthcare?

I think, in general, occupational therapists are really unique. I think we all have a passion for the humanities.  What drew me to occupational therapy is that it incorporates a lot of my different loves: the health field, architecture and modeling, art, working with children and the education component there.  It’s a very creative field and I feel that all OTs have the passion for a lot of different fields in life.  I don’t really think that our field has changed much, of course, there’s new research that comes out that helps change how we treat our patients a little bit, but at the same time, I think our roots of occupational therapy, based in psychology and the basis of educating and adapting ways to complete purposeful and meaningful activities.  I think that’s where the core of occupational therapy is and I don’t think it’s changed so much in that regard.


Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds-Wellness Style

Therapists have a unique relationship with their itself, therapists also stress the importance of wellness throughout the year.  Our clinicians not only have strong beliefs in achieving goals of physical, mental and emotional wellness for their patients but also for themselves!  Lucy, PT, shares a piece that achieves all three: a call for exercise but delivered with some laughter.  Boost your goal to wellness with this awesome playlist!

Elite AthleteI LOVE to exercise! I equally LOVE music. When you put the two together, “What a Feeling!” as Irene Cara would sing. Music and exercise, exercise and music are certainly as great as Simon and Garfunkel or Sonny and Cher. Can there be a better duet than your favorite exercise with your favorite song?

Read more


Posted in General, Wellness

Salt Thrower: (noun)

Indispensible workers who are willing to do what it takes to help the company succeed even in the most difficult times.  Those who pick up the slack when the organization is forced to cut back; those whose ideas save time, money, and effort; those with a positive outlook who help keep the organization moving forward. Read more